CCUBC Science Promotion Prize!

I’m so pleased to have awarded the 2014 Science Promotion Prize by the Canadian Council of University Biology Chairs (CCUBC). I work as hard as I can to turn kids into scientists and to help build public support for science in general. It’s very gratifying to know that biologists across Canada have noticed my efforts. I’m truly moved by this. I feel very honoured.

2014-11-14 14.02.22

I was on CNN – Talking Ebola, Dogs, and Bats

I appeared on CNN last night to help give context to the euthanization of Excalibur, the pet dog of the Spanish nurse who has contracted the ebola virus. My CNN interview is here:

I thought it might be helpful for me to follow up with some more thorough explanations:

Can animals get Ebola?
Yes Absolutely. Ebola affects humans, chimpanzees, and gorillas.

What animal first gave ebola to humans? Continue reading

Working with TV crews: A guide for scientists/researchers

50641096Summary Huzzah! You’ve been approached by a group of TV people who want to highlight your work! Congrats! Making your science accessible is a great thing to do, because it helps to make you a better communicator for grant applications and conferences, and because it also makes the world a better place. But doing TV can be unnerving, and can sometimes cause frustrations that might leave you wondering why you ever bothered to do TV in the first place. I was once a full-time scientist, but now I work as a TV producer/host trying to make your science accessible by interviewing people like you. I’ve written this article as advice, to help you have a positive experience when you work with people like me. If nothing else, I suggest that you keep in mind that TV crews will usually have different objectives than you will. Below, I explain that concept further, and then offer some suggestions that you, as a scientist interviewee, can use to feel a sense of control through the process. Continue reading

Congrats co-author Jorn!

Jorn Cheney is a grad student at Brown University in the lab where I once worked as a postdoc. Some work we did together has finally come out the other side of the peer review process, and is now offically accepted. Congrats, Jorn! Here’s the full citation:

Cheney, J. A., Ton, D., Konow, N., Riskin, D. K., Breuer, K. S., and Swartz, S. M. (In Press). Hindlimb motion during steady flight of the lesser dog-faced fruit bat, Cynopterus brachyotis. PLoS One. Accepted April 30, 2014.

(I’m also happy for myself, since I haven’t had a paper come out in a while.)

It’s been a while

I can’t believe I haven’t updated in so long. The book is out in the US and in Canada. It’s selling well. The reviews have been pretty kind. I guess I’ve just been so busy I haven’t updated, but I thought I’d just put this up so you’d know this website is still active. Now you know.